Paul's Passing Thoughts

Eric From Clearcreek Chapel Area Risks Church Discipline to Save Me from “Bitterness”

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on April 12, 2015

 

Eric 2

Eric,

So much ideology is packed into your often-used 5-word Reformed statement: “You are a bitter man.” Like the other Reformed 5-word bumper sticker, “Jesus died for our sins,” it encompasses a whole body of philosophy. The thrust of these statements follows: excluding what doesn’t exist according to the ideology. I am either bitter or not bitter. Why? Because the only cause of bitterness is a lie and doesn’t exist according Reformed ideology: oppression.

There is no such thing as oppression according to Reformed theology, only grace. Grace is defined by the reality of existence that never receives what it fully deserves; therefore, no matter what people do to you, it falls short of what you fully deserve, therefore, all abuse should be received with thankfulness.

Hence, the Reformed definition of a bitter man or woman: one who doesn’t understand grace.

So, what you are saying is that I don’t understand grace. People are either bitter or not bitter–they either understand grace or don’t understand grace. They either understand that the sum total of life is zero making justice a myth or they don’t.

Hence, to put value on life is synonymous with bitterness because justice puts a value on life. Justice restrains those who refuse to treat others as they would want to be treated. According to Reformed philosophy, grace and justice are mutually exclusive and Calvin/Luther both stated that explicitly.

This is fundamentality what put me at odds with the Clearcreek elders though I was a long way from knowing it at the time (by the way, I noticed that your IP address is from Springboro), which is why I am not bitter. I was so blinded by Reformed ideology that it took the full wrath of their fundamental wickedness to wake me from my slumber. I could still be there learning to disassociate myself from reality more and more.

What does that look like? It can be defined by two sons who lost their fathers. When I lost my father whom I led to the Lord one day before his death, I cried out to God in mourning that cannot be described with words proclaiming, “You will take care of him now, you will take care of him now!” By the way, I was informed by elder Devon Berry before I left Clearcreek Chapel that God using me to lead my dad to the Lord, as well as everything else I had done at Clearcreek Chapel for 20 years was “walking in darkness.” Why? Because my worldview does not profess “Perplexity” in knowing anything other than “Christ and Him crucified,” viz, ALL wisdom is hidden in suffering (Luther).

Now let’s compare my worldview with the stoic public testimony of Pastor Rick Wilson’s son at Rick’s funeral: “My dad was a wicked sinner.”

Eric, Eric, Eric, do you really think I am bitter because I can longer hang with you guys? Really? What is the fundamental difference between you and ISIS? Nothing, because the fundamental worldview is exactly the same. In both cases, horizontal justice is a metaphysical concept rejected as true reality. How scary is that?

Eric, I am not bitter towards the Clearcreek caliphate, I am terrified that others will become members there. My duty to warn others about you is a joy, not a bitterness by any means.

But I understand what you are saying: grace and horizontal justice are mutually exclusive making justice a myth. Well, I’m sorry, I disagree, but you seem a little bitter about my bitterness.

And Eric, just a heads up, you could be brought up on church discipline for coming to my blog per the Clearcreek elders, but I won’t tell.

paul

CCC

 

The Biblical Counseling Death Culture

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on September 18, 2014

“Secular” Is NOT Synonymous with “Evil”

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on August 27, 2014

Gnosticism does not interpret reality in three dimensions. That’s why it is of the Dualism family of philosophy. EVERYTHING is good or evil, material or invisible. This is the “knowledge of good and evil.” ALL of reality is interpreted and defined by one or the other. This also involves Anti-Type epistemology as well: opposites define each other; we would not know light if not for darkness, and evil gives deeper understanding of good and vice versa.

This was the basic hypothesis of the Calvin Institutes (see 1.1.1.) and Protestantism in particular. Martin Luther interpreted ALL reality via the “glory story” and the “cross story.” The story of man and the story of redemption. Luther believed that man cannot reason or know reality, and God sent Christ to marry the invisible to the visible as the only gateway of wellbeing—the only gateway of understanding between the shadow world and the true forms through suffering. This IS the Redemptive Historical Hermeneutic so highly touted in Reformed circles. It is behind comments by the likes of John MacArthur Jr. that people doubt their salvation because they have not suffered enough as a Christian.

This worldview has seriously crippled Christianity’s ability to minister to the world because, among many examples, the secular is always defined as being evil. America was founded on secular principles: separation of church and state. The founding fathers saw the secular as a force for good that freed man to pursue life and happiness. This was the first time in history where faith and force were separated.

Other words that are unfortunate Christian synonyms for evil… “flesh,” and “leaven.” The latter often denotes influence whether good or evil; the former, like the secular, can be used for good or evil. The framers recognized that church and secular together,  never turns out well. This is why movements such as the Moral Majority are egregiously misguided.

Here is an example of God using the secular for good purposes, and His call to Christians to support such:

Romans 13:1 – Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God. 2 Therefore whoever resists the authorities resists what God has appointed, and those who resist will incur judgment. 3 For rulers are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad. Would you have no fear of the one who is in authority? Then do what is good, and you will receive his approval, 4 for he is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain. For he is the servant of God, an avenger who carries out God’s wrath on the wrongdoer. 5 Therefore one must be in subjection, not only to avoid God’s wrath but also for the sake of conscience. 6 For because of this you also pay taxes, for the authorities are ministers of God, attending to this very thing. 7 Pay to all what is owed to them: taxes to whom taxes are owed, revenue to whom revenue is owed, respect to whom respect is owed, honor to whom honor is owed.

paul

Biblical Thinking Leads to Joy in the Midst of Trials: James 1:2-4,13,14

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on April 13, 2010

“But we must remember, the God who bestows the same blessings on the just and the unjust, may also shower us with the same trials as well.”

I don’t know about you, but I like it both ways. I want life to go my way down here and then retire to Heaven. Hey, I’m not asking for much, cats have 9 lives, I only want 2. Trials are annoying, disruptive, inconvenient, and downright painful. Wouldn’t you agree with that? I hope not. If you agree with that, you are well on your way to adding more misery to your life.

James begins with the word “consider” (Ecc. 7:14), or as some commentators note: “evaluate.” The first thing you must employ in a trial is biblical reason. Emotions will be there, but it must take a back seat to reason. Specifically, biblical reason. Verses 13 and 14 (of chapter 1) used to perplex me in James’  line of thinking here, and I confess that I do not entirely understand all of the implications in regard to trials, but think I’m on safe ground in regard to the following: (“Let no one say when he is tempted, ‘I am being tempted by God,’ for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire”) In the beginning and midst of a trial, we will be tempted. This is clearly the context of verses 13 and 14. How will we be tempted? By desire. Whatever meaning you want to attach to desire here, the following cannot be refuted; our desires produce thoughts, and it’s not our “desire” to be in a trial. Let the warfare commence; the mind of Christ verses desire. Desire and emotions produce thoughts that “lure” us away from right thinking that leads to stability and right doing. This can clearly be seen when Satan approached Eve to do warfare with her. His goal was to first change her thinking, and then appeal to desire. Obviously. Be sure of this; when you are in a trial, philosophies contrary to God’s word will come knocking and desire will be there waiting to help. The source of the desires James is speaking of is the “flesh” (Eph 2:3, Ro 13:14, Ga 5:16 Ga 5:17 Ga 5:24).

If you are looking to James for some deep and philosophical knowledge in regard to why bad things happen to good people, you have come to the wrong place. I can’t wait to meet James because he is a nuts and bolts guy. The last thing we need when we are in a trial is a long in-depth course in philosophy. The trials of life are no time to be figuring things out, James shows the way in no uncertain terms. Please hear me; when a friend is in a trail, do not take him, or her, a stinking book written by some big name theologian. Do your job, go to them with the mind of Christ and his compassion.

Our first thought when we find ourselves in a trial needs to be the following: “this is a good thing” (consider it ALL joy). James cushions his direct style with, “my brothers.”  Before we get into the specific reason for joy stated by James, let me interject some other scripture that speaks to the why we should be thankful and joyful for trials: It is proof positive that God is working in our lives.

“If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons” (Heb 12:8).

Though this verse speaks of reproof, a reading of this verse in context reveals the very close relationship between discipline and trials (Heb 12:3-17). God is completely sovereign and always has a specific purpose in bringing events into the lives of believers and even unbelievers (Matt 5:45 1Thess 5:18 Pro 16:9). Trials exhibit God’s care for us and indicate that we belong to him. It also indicates the very working hands of God in our life. That is why 1Thess 5:18 tells us that we can be thankful in “every circumstance.” Furthermore, trials lead to comfort that equips us to help others have comfort (2Cor 1:3-7). Therefore, trials have yet another purpose of training us in order to help others.

James also cites the specific benefit of developed perseverance or steadfastness. Apparently, growing in perseverance facilitates growth in all area’s of life (“perfect and complete, lacking nothing”). There are many other elements of trials that could be gleaned but the point is this: pondering the various truths concerning what God is up to in trials should give us hope, joy, peace and assurance.

However, don’t miss what James says about being caught off guard. He says trials are of “various kinds.” Often, trials are not what we expect. Trials often come in a form or type that we would never dream could happen to us. Peter put it this way: “Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you” (1 Peter 4;12). What kind of trial could happen to me? Anything. Usually, Christians can be caught off guard by the severity of  a trial (“fiery”). But we must remember, the God who bestows the same blessings on the just and the unjust, may also shower us with the same trials as well (Matt. 5:4,5  Ecc. 7:14). Being dazed and confused is not helpful in regard to sound, Christlike  thinking. Sometimes, clarifying this reality is where you might have to begin.

paul

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Biblical Thinking Leads to Joy in the Midst of Trials: James 1:2-4,13,14

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on May 9, 2009

“But we must remember, the God who bestows the same blessings on the just and the unjust, may also shower us with the same trials as well.”

I don’t know about you, but I like it both ways. I want life to go my way down here and then retire to Heaven. Hey, I’m not asking for much, cat’s have 9 lives, I only want 2. Trials are annoying, disruptive, inconvenient, and downright painful. Wouldn’t you agree with that? I hope not. If you agree with that, you are well on your way to adding more misery to your life.

James begins with the word “consider” (Ecc. 7:14), or as some commentators note: “evaluate.” The first thing you must employ in a trial is biblical reason. Emotion will be there, but it must take a back seat to reason. Specifically, biblical reason. Verses 13 and 14 (of chapter 1) used to perplex me in James’  line of thinking here and I confess that I do not entirely understand all of the implications in regard to trials, but I’m on safe ground in regard to the following: (“Let no one say when he is tempted, ‘I am being tempted by God,’ for God cannot be tempted with evil, and he himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire”) In the beginning and midst of a trial, we will be tempted. This is clearly the context of verses 13 and 14. How will we be tempted? By desire. Whatever meaning you want to attach to desire here, the following cannot be refuted; our desires produce thoughts, and it’s not our “desire” to be in a trial. Let the warfare commence, the mind of Christ verses desire. Desire and emotions produce thoughts that “lure” us away from right thinking that leads to stability and right doing. This can clearly be seen when Satan approached Eve to do warfare with her. His goal was to change her thinking and appeal to desire. Obviously. Be sure of this, when you are in a trial, philosophies contrary to God’s word will come knocking and desire will be there waiting to help. The source of the desires James is speaking of is the “flesh” (Eph 2:3, Ro 13:14, Ga 5:16 Ga 5:17 Ga 5:24).

If you are looking to James for some deep and philosophical knowledge in regard to why bad things happen to good people, you have come to the wrong place. I can’t wait to meet James because he is a nuts and bolts guy. The last thing we need when we are in a trial is a long in-depth course in philosophy. The trials of life are no time to be figuring things out, James shows the way in no uncertain terms. Please hear me, when a friend is in a trail, do not take him, or her, a stinking book written by some big name theologian. Do your job, go to them with the mind of Christ and his compassion.

Our first thought when we find ourselves in a trial needs to be the following: “this is a good thing” (consider it ALL joy). James cushions his direct style with, “my brothers.”  Before we get into the specific reason for joy stated by James, let me interject some other scripture that speaks to the why we should be thankful and joyful for trials: It is proof positive that God is working in our lives.

“If you are left without discipline, in which all have participated, then you are illegitimate children and not sons” (Heb 12:8).

Though this verse speaks of reproof, a reading of this verse in context reveals the very close relationship between discipline and trials (Heb 12:3-17). God is completely sovereign and always has a specific purpose in bringing events into the lives of believers and even unbelievers (Matt 5:45 1Thess 5:18 Pro 16:9). Trials exhibit God’s care for us and indicate that we belong to him. It also indicates the very working hands of God in our life. That is why 1Thess 5:18 tells us that we can be thankful in “every circumstance.” Furthermore, trials lead to comfort that equips us to help others have comfort (2Cor 1:3-7). Therefore, trials have yet another purpose of training us in order to help others.

James also cites the specific benefit of developed perseverance or steadfastness. Apparently, growing in perseverance facilitates growth in all area’s of life (“perfect and complete, lacking nothing”). There are many other elements of trials that could be gleaned but the point is this: pondering the various truths concerning what God is up to in trials should give us hope, joy, peace and assurance.

However, don’t miss what James says about being caught off guard. He says trials are of “various kinds.” Often, trials are not what we expect. Trials often come in a form or type that we would never dream could happen to us. Peter put it this way: “Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you” (1 Peter 4;12). What kind of trial could happen to me? Anything. Usually, Christians can be caught off guard by the severity of the trial (“fiery”). But we must remember, the God who bestows the same blessings on the just and the unjust, may also shower us with the same trials as well (Matt. 5:4,5  Ecc. 7:14). Being dazed and confused is not helpful in regard to sound, Christlike  thinking. Sometimes, clarifying this reality is where you might have to begin.

paul

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