Paul's Passing Thoughts

Blank Check Forgiveness Equals Zero Sum Life

Posted in Uncategorized by Andy Young, PPT contributing editor on June 13, 2018

Originally published May 2, 2016

Completely absent from forgiveness mania among dumbed-down Christians is any kind of understanding in regard to how justice figures into the forgiveness equation. While insisting that “we forgive others the way God forgave us,” the formula presented for doing so is in no way, shape or form indicative of how God in fact forgives us. This is just one more example in the midst of myriad in considering how confused and illogical evangelicals are. While clamoring about with much indignation in regard to abortion’s devaluing of life, Christians witlessly ply blank check forgiveness and its default zero sum life equation.

Again, the contradiction is justice—justice only exists for the sake of life value. Invariably, injustice and zero sum life walk together hand in hand. It is no surprise that blank check forgiveness comes from the Protestant tradition as the Reformers believed that injustice only occurs between man and God. They considered horizontal injustice (injustice between people) a metaphysical anomaly. Hence, one never gets what he/she deserves in this life as everybody deserves eternal hell. And, to not forgive automatically makes you better than the person you are not forgiving. This is also where moral equivalency, blank check forgiveness, injustice, and zero sum life are all members of the same motley crew.

Blank check forgiveness devalues life by not holding people accountable for sinning against you or others. We don’t hold dogs accountable because they don’t know any better as animals of mostly instinct. And in essence, the same reasons are given for blank check forgiveness among people; they are “totally depraved” and enslaved to sinful instincts. In fact, John Calvin deemed humanity as nothing more than “worms crawling on the ground” while Martin Luther thought that description too charitable in regard to human nature.

Withholding forgiveness keeps the sin of the offender ever before them, and upholds life. Remember, sin is framed as a life/death paradigm in Scripture. This does not mean we do not leave revenge to the Lord, it means we uphold life by demanding repentance from each other. The opposite of revenge is loving our enemies, but in many instances, blank check forgiveness is the opposite of love.

It often reflects our view of others and the value of life in general.

paul

Loving Ourselves

Posted in Uncategorized by Andy Young, PPT contributing editor on March 30, 2017

Does the Bible ever state that to love ourselves is a sin? I don’t believe so. In fact it never even suggests that we are to love others MORE than ourselves. We are to love others AS MUCH AS we love ourselves.

“For no man ever yet hated his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it…” ~ Ephesians 5:29

“For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.” ~ Galatians 5:14

“If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself,’ ye do well:” ~ James 2:8

“Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.” ~ Romans 13:8

“But as touching brotherly love ye need not that I write unto you: for ye yourselves are taught of God to love one another.” ~ 1 Thessalonians 4:9

“Ye have heard that it hath been said, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.’ But I say unto you, love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; that ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.” ~ Matthew 5:43-45

“ ‘Master, which is the great commandment in the law?’ Jesus said unto him, ‘Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.’ ” ~ Matthew 22:36-40

To love yourself is to recognize your own value. If you do not recognize your own worth then you cannot recognize the value of others.

There is application here for just about all of the problems we see in the institutional church.  What is the historical orthodoxy?  What has been taught about man?  The metaphysical premise is man’s depravity.  Man is taught that self-loathing is a virtue.  Believers have been discouraged from striving for obedience to the law.  The law has been replaced with orthodoxy (tradition).  This is the definition of anomia; lawlessness.  Jesus told the religious leaders of His day that by replacing the law with their traditions that they made the law useless.  The result would be that love would grow cold.

This is what such thinking produces.    And this is exactly what we are seeing in this day.  Is it any wonder?  If one is taught that they cannot keep the law because of their own depravity, how can he possibly love himself?  Why are there so many cases of divorce, depression, and mental illnesses found in the institutional church?  Why do we act shocked when we learn about these sorts of things happening in the institutional church?  For the believer, he is taught that an ever-increasing awareness of sin brings about an ever-increasing knowledge of God’s holiness.  The Christian life is to be one of dwelling on sinfulness; not on value.  How can we expect justice for sexual abuse and other physical or spiritual abuses?  If one believes he has no value, how can he possibly love others?  Others have no value.  Others then are nothing more than objects to be used for one’s own end.

Do you realize that if we spent our time focusing on loving others, we wouldn’t have to worry about breaking any laws?  Think about that for a second.  When it comes right down to it, isn’t the breaking of any law really a violation of the rights of another?  It says, “I don’t value you.”  Why don’t we steal?  Is it because God said, “thou shalt not steal?”  Or is it because we recognize that we would not want our things stolen?  This ought to reveal our own sense of self-worth, which flies in the face of religious orthodoxy in direct opposition to the notion of total depravity.  And in recognizing this self-worth, we then project that onto others.  We recognize the value of others because we recognize our own value.  God’s law teaches us that we have value!

Andy

Blank Check Forgiveness Equals Zero Sum Life

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on May 2, 2016

ppt-jpeg4Completely absent from forgiveness mania among dumbed-down Christians is any kind of understanding in regard to how justice figures into the forgiveness equation. While insisting that “we forgive others the way God forgave us,” the formula presented for doing so is in no way, shape or form indicative of how God in fact forgives us. This is just one more example in the midst of myriad in considering how confused and illogical evangelicals are. While clamoring about with much indignation in regard to abortion’s devaluing of life, Christians witlessly ply blank check forgiveness and its default zero sum life equation.

Again, the contradiction is justice—justice only exists for the sake of life value. Invariably, injustice and zero sum life walk together hand in hand. It is no surprise that blank check forgiveness comes from the Protestant tradition as the Reformers believed that injustice only occurs between man and God. They considered horizontal injustice (injustice between people) a metaphysical anomaly. Hence, one never gets what he/she deserves in this life as everybody deserves eternal hell. And, to not forgive automatically makes you better than the person you are not forgiving. This is also where moral equivalency, blank check forgiveness, injustice, and zero sum life are all members of the same motley crew.

Blank check forgiveness devalues life by not holding people accountable for sinning against you or others. We don’t hold dogs accountable because they don’t know any better as animals of mostly instinct. And in essence, the same reasons are given for blank check forgiveness among people; they are “totally depraved” and enslaved to sinful instincts. In fact, John Calvin deemed humanity as nothing more than “worms crawling on the ground” while Martin Luther thought that description too charitable in regard to human nature.

Withholding forgiveness keeps the sin of the offender ever before them, and upholds life. Remember, sin is framed as a life/death paradigm in Scripture. This does not mean we do not leave revenge to the Lord, it means we uphold life by demanding repentance from each other. The opposite of revenge is loving our enemies, but in many instances, blank check forgiveness is the opposite of love.

It often reflects our view of others and the value of life in general.

paul

Loving Ourselves

Posted in Uncategorized by Andy Young, PPT contributing editor on March 3, 2016

Does the Bible ever state that to love ourselves is a sin? I don’t believe so. In fact it never even suggests that we are to love others MORE than ourselves. We are to love others AS MUCH AS we love ourselves.

“For no man ever yet hated his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it…” ~ Ephesians 5:29

“For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.” ~ Galatians 5:14

“If ye fulfil the royal law according to the scripture, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself,’ ye do well:” ~ James 2:8

“Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.” ~ Romans 13:8

“But as touching brotherly love ye need not that I write unto you: for ye yourselves are taught of God to love one another.” ~ 1 Thessalonians 4:9

“Ye have heard that it hath been said, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy.’ But I say unto you, love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; that ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.” ~ Matthew 5:43-45

“ ‘Master, which is the great commandment in the law?’ Jesus said unto him, ‘Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.’ ” ~ Matthew 22:36-40

To love yourself is to recognize your own value. If you do not recognize your own worth then you cannot recognize the value of others.

There is application here for just about all of the problems we see in the institutional church.  What is the historical orthodoxy?  What has been taught about man?  The metaphysical premise is man’s depravity.  Man is taught that self-loathing is a virtue.  Believers have been discouraged from striving for obedience to the law.  The law has been replaced with orthodoxy (tradition).  This is the definition of anomia; lawlessness.  Jesus told the religious leaders of His day that by replacing the law with their traditions that they made the law useless.  The result would be that love would grow cold.

This is what such thinking produces.    And this is exactly what we are seeing in this day.  Is it any wonder?  If one is taught that they cannot keep the law because of their own depravity, how can he possibly love himself?  Why are there so many cases of divorce, depression, and mental illnesses found in the institutional church?  Why do we act shocked when we learn about these sorts of things happening in the institutional church?  For the believer, he is taught that an ever-increasing awareness of sin brings about an ever-increasing knowledge of God’s holiness.  The Christian life is to be one of dwelling on sinfulness; not on value.  How can we expect justice for sexual abuse and other physical or spiritual abuses?  If one believes he has no value, how can he possibly love others?  Others have no value.  Others then are nothing more than objects to be used for one’s own end.

Do you realize that if we spent our time focusing on loving others, we wouldn’t have to worry about breaking any laws?  Think about that for a second.  When it comes right down to it, isn’t the breaking of any law really a violation of the rights of another?  It says, “I don’t value you.”  Why don’t we steal?  Is it because God said, “thou shalt not steal?”  Or is it because we recognize that we would not want our things stolen?  This ought to reveal our own sense of self-worth, which flies in the face of religious orthodoxy in direct opposition to the notion of total depravity.  And in recognizing this self-worth, we then project that onto others.  We recognize the value of others because we recognize our own value.  God’s law teaches us that we have value!

Andy

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