Paul's Passing Thoughts

Gospel Sanctification: The End Times False Gospel

Posted in Uncategorized by Paul M. Dohse Sr. on July 6, 2015

The Potter’s House 7/5/2015 

Part 1 – 50 minutes. 

Part 2 – 15 minutes. 

 

2 Responses

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  1. Andy Young, PPT contributing editor said, on July 6, 2015 at 11:03 AM

    Regarding big, theological, “50-cent” words: I think it says much about what you presume about the intelligence of your audience. Rather than assuming they are dolts who need to be talked-down to, you assume that you are speaking to intellectual equals, or seeking to bring them up to a higher level; equipping and edifying! I think the latter shows a high level of respect for those you wish to teach.

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  2. Andy Young, PPT contributing editor said, on July 6, 2015 at 11:04 AM

    From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doublespeak

    Doublespeak is language that deliberately disguises, distorts, or reverses the meaning of words. Doublespeak may take the form of euphemisms (e.g., “downsizing” for layoffs, “servicing the target” for bombing), in which case it is primarily meant to make the truth sound more palatable. It may also refer to intentional ambiguity in language or to actual inversions of meaning (for example, naming a state of war “peace”). In such cases, doublespeak disguises the nature of the truth.

    Edward S. Herman, political economist and media analyst, has highlighted some examples of doublespeak and doublethink in modern society. Herman describes in his book, Beyond Hypocrisy the principal characteristics of doublespeak:

    What is really important in the world of doublespeak is the ability to lie, whether knowingly or unconsciously, and to get away with it; and the ability to use lies and choose and shape facts selectively, blocking out those that don’t fit an agenda or program…

    In his essay “Politics and the English Language”, George Orwell observes that political language serves to distort and obfuscate reality. Orwell’s description of political speech is extremely similar to the contemporary definition of doublespeak;

    In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defence of the indefensible… Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness… the great enemy of clear language is insincerity. Where there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms…

    Whereas in the early days of the practice it was considered wrong to construct words to disguise meaning, this is now an accepted and established practice. There is a thriving industry in constructing words without explicit meaning but with particular connotations for new products or companies. Doublespeak is also employed in the field of politics. Hence, education is necessary to recognize and combat against doublespeak-use effectively.

    Educating students has been suggested by experts to be one of the ways to counter doublespeak. Educating students in the English language is important to help them identify how doublespeak is being used to mislead and conceal information.

    Charles Weingartner, one of the founding members of the NCTE committee on Public Doublespeak mentioned: “people do not know enough about the subject (the reality) to recognize that the language being used conceals, distorts, misleads”. There is a crucial need for English language teachers to educate and become experts in teaching about linguistic vulnerability. “Teachers of English should teach our students that words are not things, but verbal tokens or signs of things that should finally be carried back to the things that they stand for to be verified.

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